It Takes an Information Community to Raise a Business

With some people working from home, some wanting to leave face-to-face services with customers who are not compliant with social distancing rules, and some staring down the barrel of redundancy, there have possibly never been more information professionals contemplating self-employment. Here are some tips and resources from my experience this year setting up Beginning Cataloguing.

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With thanks to Marydee Ojala for commissioning this article, and featuring it as the top story on the ILI 365 website. Their latest newsletter includes an article on Google Trends by Marydee herself.

2020 Blog Posts by Ash Green

Ash Green profile picture

2020 was a busy and creative time for Ash. As well as helping get Beginning Cataloguing off the ground and running our first online workshop, they collaborated with lots of other people, some of whom they mention in their end-of-year round-up.

Here are some blog posts that Ash wrote or co-wrote last year, which, although completed outside their role as a Beginning Cataloguing Associate, may well be of interest to you:

Steven Dryden and Ash Green (2020). ‘LBTQ+ Lives Online’, UK Web Archive Blog, 31 July, https://blogs.bl.uk/webarchive/2020/07/lgbtq-lives-online-.html.

Steven Dryden and Ash Green (2020). ‘LGBTQ+ Lives Online: Introducing the Lead Curators’, UK Web Archive Blog, 3 November, https://blogs.bl.uk/webarchive/2020/11/lgbtq-lives-online-introducing-the-lead-curators.html.

Steven Dryden and Ash Green (2020). ‘LGBTQ+ Lives Online Web Archive Collection’, UK Web Archive Blog, 25 November, https://blogs.bl.uk/webarchive/2020/11/lgbtq-lives-online-web-archive-collection.html.

Ash Green (2020). ‘Reflections During International Games Week and Transgender Awareness Week’, Digital Scholarship Blog, 13 November, https://blogs.bl.uk/digital-scholarship/2020/11/reflections-during-international-games-week-and-transgender-awareness-week.html.

Ash Green (2020). ‘Winter Folklore in Video Games’, Cresswell Crags Blog, 18 December, https://www.creswell-crags.org.uk/2020/12/18/winter-folklore-in-video-games-a-guest-blog-post-by-ash-green.

You can keep up with Ash’s work outside Beginning Cataloguing by following them on Twitter and / or reading their blog, Ash Green Creates.

Beginning Cataloguing Bookshop

How would you like to support us AND independent book shops, just by buying books?

Some of you may remember that when we started our newsletter, Beginning Cataloguing Monthly, we looked for affiliate links that share our values.

Now we’re very happy to share that with Bookshop.org having entered the UK market, we have been able to set up an affiliate “shop” at https://uk.bookshop.org/shop/beginningcataloguing.

So far, we’ve added two lists:

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Book History Seminar: LGBTQ+ Publishing History

Our next Book History Seminar will take place on Wednesday 13 January at 1pm.

In this live-only seminar, we will discuss factors affecting the publication and circulation of LGBTQ+ fiction in postwar Britain. We will examine how obscenity statutes and laws criminalising homosexuality impacted everything from a book’s text, to its cover design, to how and where it was sold. Examples will be drawn from the speaker’s personal collection.

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The Unwritten Book (General Seminar)

Yesterday, Yvonne Lewis shared the story of ‘The Unwritten Book’ – the evidence William John Bankes left behind him of his travels, and, in particular, a set of lithography stones intended for publication in a book that was never printed in the end.

There are many reasons that these stones are both interesting and mysterious, but the greatest mystery is why they exist in the first place. Lithography was invented in Munich in 1798 by Alois Senefelder, and as Michael Twyman points out in his core text on the topic, “the lithographed book is almost as old as lithography itself” (p. 15). One of its leading proponents in Britain, Charles Hullmandel, set up his press in 1819, and so Bankes’s travels (circa 1815-17) coincided with the very earliest period of English lithography. Hullmandel’s marks appear on the back of the stones, and, as Twyman asserted in a paper he gave in 2016, “Hullmandel can be linked with the stones now at Kingston Lacy in several ways. First and foremost he owned them all, at least initially. Secondly, he made the drawings on some of them himself. And, thirdly, wherever a printer’s imprint appears on a stone it is his.”

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Printmaking Techniques in Book Illustration

Join us online on Tuesday 8 December for our next Book History Seminar, in which Krystle Attard Trevisan will share her curatorial and research expertise in printmaking techniques in book illustration.

Krystle is the first art historian in Malta specializing in historical prints and book illustration. Her ongoing doctoral research includes cataloguing and studying the only intact 18th century print collection in a public museum of over 4,500 prints amassed by one man. She has also started hunting for Incunabula in Malta with a team of other researchers. She has recently joined MUŻA, the Malta National Community Art Museum that houses the national collection of art, where one of her tasks is to research the prints and rare books that have remained unstudied for years. Her passion is to teach about the importance of printmaking in the history of art and of the book through public outreach and object-based study.

This is a live-only seminar – no preparation in advance (except for the speaker, obviously), no recordings afterwards, just an expert speaker talking on Zoom for around half and hour followed by group discussion and chat.

Full details and registration: https://beginningcataloguing.teachable.com/p/bookhistory-seminar-december